The University of Massachusetts Amherst

News

The W. E. B. Du Bois Center at UMass Amherst Libraries has been selected for the 2019 Best of Amherst Award in the Education Center category by the Amherst Award Program.

Each year, the Amherst Award Program identifies companies and places that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These nominees enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community and help make the Amherst area a great place to live, work, and play.

The Amherst Award Program is an annual awards program established to honor the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Amherst area. The organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations, and other business advertising and marketing groups. Its mission is to recognize the small business community's contributions to the U.S. economy.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst today announced the acquisition of the papers of Daniel Ellsberg, one of the nation’s foremost political activists and whistleblowers. Following a decade as a high-level government official, researcher and consultant, Ellsberg distributed the top-secret Pentagon Papers in 1971, exposing decades of deceit by American policymakers during the Vietnam War.

The life work of Ellsberg, 88, as documented in an extraordinary collection of papers, annotated books and photographs, will be managed and made available to scholars and the public by Special Collections and University Archives at the W.E.B. Du Bois Library at UMass Amherst. Ellsberg, who holds a Ph.D. in economics and remains active as a lecturer and writer, will join the university community as a Distinguished Researcher at the Du Bois Library and as a Distinguished Research Fellow at the university’s Political Economy Research Institute (PERI).

A sampling of the collection can be viewed here. Official news release here.

Mondays
9:30-11 a.m.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 22, W. E. B. Du Bois Center

Join the W. E. B. Du Bois Center for a weekly light breakfast and discussion of a text by or about Du Bois. All are welcome.

This series takes place every Monday except for the following dates:
Dec. 23
Dec. 30
Jan. 20
May 25

As of June 30, 2019, the UMass Amherst Libraries ended its subscription to Nexis Uni (formerly LexisNexis Academic). After analyzing cost, usage, technical considerations, existing subscriptions, and the needs of its patrons, the Libraries decided that its limited budget should be spent on resources that would better support research, teaching, and learning activities in the university and the community. With this decision not to renew the $62,000 Nexis Uni subscription—instead subscribing to new databases and adding to existing subscriptions—the Libraries saved approximately $43,350.50 without sacrificing access to the same or similar materials.

View the Libraries’ LibGuide for a full list of alternatives to Nexis offerings, including the following:

Westlaw is a user-friendly and comprehensive resource for legal research. It includes legislation, regulations, court and agency decisions, legal encyclopedias, and law reviews. The West Key Number System makes it easy to focus your research on a specific area of law. HeinOnline includes a wealth of historical and international legal materials. LegalTrac provides access to over 1,200 law reviews and legal newspapers, and the Topic Finder function allows you to visualize connections between search terms. In addition, the Libraries added campus-wide full-text access to Consumer Reports.

The Libraries have also subscribed to a great new resource, Access World News, which includes over 5,800 local, national, and international news sources, including newspapers, magazines, web sources, and transcripts. The Libraries continue to provide access to many newspaper databases, such as ProQuest Historical Newspapers. Additionally, the Library of Congress has digitized and made available a collection of historical American newspapers dating from 1789-1963 (Chronicling America).

The UMass Amherst Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Center (DSC) is assisting Eric Poehler, associate professor of classics at UMass Amherst, in completing the Pompeii Artistic Landscape Project (PALP), for which he received a $245,000 grant from the Getty Foundation.

The project is an online resource of images documenting existing artwork, such as frescoes and mosaics, in Pompeii, Italy. Embedded within these images are various types of metadata—data that provides information about other data—that describe the artwork as well as their locations in Pompeii, allowing scholars to search the database more easily and study the pieces within their architectural contexts.

The DSC is supporting this project by reviewing more than 150,000 images provided by Pompeii in Pictures and adding the metadata to them from Linked Open Data (LOD) resourced: publicly available, standardized data and terminology that interlinks with other data on the web to make searching easier.

“Contributing to the Pompeii Artistic Landscape Project really builds on the Digital Scholarship Center’s expertise with images,” says Brian Shelburne, director of the DSC. “It also allows us to develop new skills that we will use to support future projects by our students and faculty.”

Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019
7:30-10 p.m.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level

Join the UMass Amherst Libraries and UMass Information Technology for a fun evening of games, food, and prizes!

Sponsored by the UMass Amherst Libraries and UMass Amherst Information Technology.

Sept. 3 - Dec. 13
Reception: Wednesday, Oct. 23, 4-6 p.m.

Science & Engineering Library,
Lederle GRC Lowrise
Matthew Mattingly ’02 is an artist living and working in Western Massachusetts. The exhibit includes new and recent oils, watercolors, and ink drawings, including landscapes, figures, sketches, and works from imagination. Also on display will be custom equipment and measuring devices invented by the artist, with descriptions of construction and use.

Friday, Sept. 13
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library
Learning Commons, Lower Level, Room 43

Welcome back students!

The UMass Assistive Technology Center (ATC) will be having an open house from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Friday 9/13.

Stop by the center and check out some helpful software/tools/devices to accommodate your learning style and ensure that you everything you need to start the school year.

*Some workshop dates/times subject to change.

CANCELLED:
Petitions, Occupations, and Marches: Radical Activism at UMass Amherst (Oct. 11)
How to Find Stuff in the Libraries (Oct. 16)

Book Anatomy 101 (Oct. 17)


Learning Commons 101

Wednesday, Sept. 18, 6-7 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 25, 6-7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 2, 6-7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 9, 6-7 p.m.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Learning Commons (LC) Desk
Instructor: Learning Commons Staff

How well do you know the Learning Commons? Join us for a crash course in learning the ins, outs, workarounds, and secrets of one of the most popular places on campus. You’ll take a tour of the floor, learn about the different services and resources that are available, and get a few insider tips and hints on how to make the most of your LC experience. Ideal for undergraduates.

Introduction to 3D Modeling

Tuesday, Sept. 24, 1-2:30 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 3, Digital Media Lab
Instructor: Dennis Spencer

Want to learn how 3D modeling? The DML is offering a chance to learn Fusion 360, a free-to-use 3D modeling software that is accessible for beginners yet has professional features. This workshop will be an introduction to 3D modeling concepts, common modeling techniques, and 3D modeling a simple object. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

Let's Meet Microphones and Audio Recorders

Tuesday, Sept. 24, 7-8 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 3, Digital Media Lab
Instructor: Yuntian Hu

You've done your research, you've written your script, and you've got your location and interviewees lined up. You're now ready to do some audio recording, but you're facing lots of choices of microphones and audio recorders. If you don't have experience in audio recording, how do you choose between the different audio devices? How do you use them, and where do you use them?  This workshop will introduce you to the audio recorders and microphones in the Digital Media Lab. Attendees will learn about the different audio recording devices and the context in which each one is best used. Attendees will also learn a bit more about Digital Media Lab services that can meet further needs. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

Citation Managers 101

Wednesday, Sept. 25, Noon-1 p.m. Register here.
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 5-6 p.m.

Science and Engineering Library, Lederle GRC Lowrise
Instructor: Melanie Radik

If you hate building a list of resources and put it off until the last minute, or if your list of resources is a stack of Post-it notes, photos, and scraps of papers, then perhaps a citation manager is for you. Citation managers help you organize resources you use while researching. Librarians can show you several alternatives that you can choose from depending on which one would suit your needs. Ideal for advanced undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

W. E. B. Du Bois and His Legacy at UMass Amherst

Tuesday, Oct. 1, 11 a.m.-Noon
Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2-3 p.m.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 22, W. E. B. Du Bois Center (Room 2220)
Instructor: Adam Holmes

You've probably heard the name W. E. B. Du Bois. You've probably been in the Library named for him and have perhaps noticed his image and quotes in the lobby. But how much do you know about him? This workshop will provide a short introduction to the life of W. E. B. Du Bois and his significance as a scholar, public intellectual, and activist. The workshop will also describe the work of the W. E. B. Du Bois Center at UMass as well as the materials available on Du Bois, his life and times, through the University Archive. Refreshments will be served. Ideal for all.

Getting Started with Zotero

Wednesday, Oct. 2, Noon-1 p.m. Register here.
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 5-6 p.m.

Science and Engineering Library, Lederle GRC Lowrise
Instructor: Melanie Radik

This workshop will guide you through organizing your library, downloading new sources, adding sources you already have, editing sources, and using Zotero with Word for writing papers. Please bring your laptop with Zotero already installed, including the desktop, Word plugin, and browser add on, and signing up for an online account. If you have trouble installing Zotero, please contact the IT Help Desk before the workshop. Ideal for advanced undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

The UMass Open Access Policy and You

Thursday, Oct. 3, Noon-1 p.m. Register here.
Thursday, Oct. 24, 2-3 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 16, Room 1638

Wednesday, Nov. 20, 3-4 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 26, Faculty Commons
Instructor: Erin Jerome

Did you know that the UMass Open Access Policy can help your your scholarship reach the widest audience possible while also protecting your rights as an author? Come and learn about what the Open Access Policy means for you and what you can do to share your research with readers all over the world. Ideal for graduates and faculty.

Book Anatomy Demo

Monday, Oct. 7, 1-2:30 p.m.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lobby
Instructor: Lorraine James

Have you ever been curious about how books are made? Why some paperbacks fall apart after a few uses and some don't? Come by our table set up in the Library lobby and get a crash course on books and their construction by looking at examples. And if you enjoyed that, come to the full workshop on Oct. 17. Ideal for all.

Intro to Final Cut Pro

Tuesday, Oct. 8, 3-4:30 p.m. Register here.
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 5-6:30 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 3, Digital Media Lab 
Instructor: Adam Quirós

Do you have an interest in working with video? Final Cut Pro is a tool that allow you to edit and process video. This workshop is intended for beginners looking to ease into FCP. In this workshop you'll learn the basics steps to using the software, including navigating the interface, initial importing, organizing media, basic editing and final delivery. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and staff.

Citation Manager Support Group

Wednesday, Oct. 9, Noon-1 p.m. Register here.
Tuesday, Nov. 5, 5-6 p.m.

Science and Engineering Library, Lederle GRC Lowrise
Instructor: Science and Engineering Librarians

If you've been using a citation management tool and have gotten stuck on something, this is your chance to come in for some advice or assistance. Our librarians can get you un-stuck and on your way again. If you're wondering whether the citation mangers can do certain things that you need, come in and ask. Simple questions, hard questions - we'll take 'em all! No registration necessary - just drop in, ask your question, and you can be on your way. Ideal for all.

Add Meaning, Focus, and Empowerment to Students Seeking/Finding/Use of Information

Thursday, Oct. 10, 3:30-5 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 26, Faculty Commons
Instructor: Madeleine Charney

Do you find students often race through the creation of projects/papers? Are there information gaps or lack of passion in their work? Information Creation as a Process; Scholarship as Conversation; Searching as Strategic Exploration -- this is some of the enlivening language/practices librarians use in their classes and consultations. Learn about a framework and tools to foster a more meaningful, focused and empowering experience for students as they seek/find/use information. You will also learn about contemplative teaching resources in higher ed and right here on campus. Your own enjoyment of teaching might get a boost along the way. Ideal for faculty.

Creative Commons 101: How to Find Images, Media, and More for Your Projects

Thursday, Oct. 10, 11 a.m.-Noon Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room

Tuesday, Nov. 19, 1-2 p.m. Register here.
Science and Engineering Library, Lederle GRC Lowrise
Instructor: Lisa Di Valentino and Jennifer Friedman

Are you looking for images, audio, video, or text to include in your projects? Do you wonder about the copyright and whether or not you can use that perfect image that you found? Come join us to learn about Creative Commons (CC)! CC licenses allow people to share their work for you to use with minimal restrictions. Learn about the different licenses, how to find things with CC licenses and how you can use those items in your work! Ideal for undergraduates and graduates.

CANCELLED: Petitions, Occupations, and Marches: Radical Activism at UMass Amherst

Friday, Oct. 11, 2-3:30 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 25, Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) Seminar Room
Instructor: Blake Spitz

From the very first student class in 1867 to those over a century later protesting war, imperialism, and educational, racial, and gender disparities, activism on the UMass campus has a long and colorful history. Do you know which buildings student protesters have occupied? Which policies and politics took sections of campus by storm? What happened after protesters made their demands? Come learn how movements such as anti-Vietnam War, Black Power, feminism, unified labor, and other topics manifested locally, on your campus, led by people like you, students, staff, and faculty. Using primary sources from the University Archives, this interactive class offers a snapshot of some of the many moments of radical activism on campus, sharing a history of protest impressive in both its extent and in its lessons for today. Ideal for advanced undergraduates and graduates.

UMass Amherst Patent and Trademark Resource Center: Services Free to You!

Wednesday, Oct. 16, 11 a.m.-Noon
Thursday, Oct. 31, 2-3 p.m.

Science and Engineering Library, Lederle GRC Lowrise
Instructor: Paulina Borrego

Have an idea for a patent? Want to look up the patent for something you've been curious about? The UMass Amherst Patent & Trademark Resource Center is one of about eighty such centers in the country that provides patent and trademark help to all members of the community for free. Come learn about what resources and services are available. Ideal for all.

How to Find Stuff in the Libraries

CANCELLED: Wednesday, Oct. 16, 1-2 p.m. Register here.
Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2-3 p.m. Register here.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Kayleigh Fischietto, Jennifer Friedman

Want to find all the interesting things you can check out from the Libraries? Do you have a paper or project that's due soon and you need to find books, articles or DVDs? This session is for you!  Come join us to find out what's in the Libraries, how you can find it, how long you can have it and more! These tips and tricks will have you working smarter not harder on projects that impress. That means more time for movie nights with a selection of DVDs that will put your Netflix subscription to shame! Ideal for undergraduates and staff.

CANCELLEDBook Anatomy 101

Thursday, Oct. 17, 2-3 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 16, Room 1638
Instructor: Lorraine James

Learn how modern hard cover books are made and examine books that were bound in a variety of ways. In this hands-on workshop, you'll learn how books function (and don't function!) and how you can best care for the books you use. Ideal for all.

Staying in Character

Friday, Oct. 18, 1-2 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Kayleigh Fischietto and Sharon Domier

Are you a researcher working with a language that uses non-Latin writing systems? Do you want to more effectively discover and access sources in this language? Join area studies librarians Kayleigh Fischietto and Sharon Domier as they share best practices for searching and requesting resources from institutions around the world. Together we'll demystify everything from Romanization Tables to the Interlibrary Loan request form in order to take the hassle out of library searching. Ideal for advanced undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and staff.

Stalking (But Not in a Creepy Way) Your New Employer: Researching Company Profiles and Industry News

Friday, Oct. 25, 2-3 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Alison Messier

In the job market? Need to figure out which companies are best for you? Do you have some leads, but want to impress interviewers with your knowledge of the company? You can learn a lot about companies using Library resources! Come learn how to conduct company research to help you with your interviews and job search. Ideal for advanced undergraduates and graduates.

Your Publishing Contract

Tuesday, Oct. 29, Noon-1 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 19, Room 1938
Instructor: Laura Quilter

If you have ever published or hope to publish, you will likely be presented with a contract drafted by a lawyer. Do you know what rights you’re giving away? Do you know what rights you should keep? Come learn about about the anatomy of a contract, what’s worth bargaining for, and how to bargain, with copyright attorney Laura Quilter. Bring your contract or just your questions. Ideal for graduates and faculty.

Zines in the Academy: Using Self-Published, DIY Publications for Research

Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2-3 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 16, Room 1638
Instructor: Annie Sollinger

This workshop will introduce you to zines - the self-publishing phenomenon. We will investigate zines as a democratic medium, as information objects, and as a mode of personal expression. We will discuss their history, their place in academic research, the ethical questions that are raised by diving into the medium, and look at a range of examples. We will also show participants where they can be found throughout the 5 Colleges, Pioneer Valley, and beyond. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and staff.

Getting to Know Version Control with Git and GitHub

Friday, Nov. 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Register here.
Monday, Nov. 18, 11 a.m.-Noon Register here.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 19, Room 1920
Instructor: Thea Atwood

Version control is one way to track changes to files on your computer, and is regularly used for project management in collaborative environments. Git is one of the most widely used version control systems in the world. It is useful to both individuals and groups to track changes, manage conflicts in files, and share workflows and resources. In this live demonstration, participants will be introduced to the platforms Git and GitHub, and common functions for version control in Git. You are welcome to follow along on your own device, but it is not a requirement. If you do want to follow along, you must bring your own laptop that can connect to wifi. Instructions on how to install Git and set up your GitHub account will be sent ahead of the demonstration. Ideal for advanced undergraduates, graduates, faculty, staff, post-docs, and research assistants.

What's in a Map? A Crash-Course in GIS for the Humanities and Fine Arts

Monday, Nov. 4, 2-4 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Becky Seifried

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a catch-all term for the software that helps us create stellar maps and explore spatial patterns in our data. If you have ever used Google Maps to scope out your neighborhood or checked out interactive maps on the web, you already have experience using an Online GIS. But the software can be used for a lot more than just displaying information. Whether you are directly engaged in digital humanities research or just interested in where your favorite [insert thing you study here] comes from, GIS is an essential tool for analyzing geospatial data and identifying patterns over space and time. This two-hour workshop is meant for both students and faculty. It will provide an overview of GIS and introduce its potential applications in fields across the Humanities and Fine Arts. Ideal for HFA undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

Ancestry.com Basics

Wednesday, Nov. 6, 1-2 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Kate Freedman

Ancestry.com is among the world's largest databases of digitized primary source material. It contains a wealth of information for genealogists and historians alike. In this workshop, you will learn how to find individual names in Ancestry's database and how to make sure you found the individual that you were looking for (after all, there are a lot of John Browns and Jane Smiths in there). Ideal for advanced undergraduates, graduates, faculty, staff, and community members interested in genealogy.

Designing Poster Presentations: Tips for Great Posters!

Thursday, Nov. 7, 11 a.m.-Noon Register here.
Science and Engineering Library, Lederle GRC Lowrise

Wednesday, Nov. 20, 1-2 p.m. Register here.

W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Jennifer Friedman and Rebecca Reznik-Zellen

Do you have a presentation that requires a poster? Not sure where to start or the best way to design a poster? Come join us! Learn about different poster templates and where to find them, as well as what types of content can go on a poster and best practices for designing a poster that stands out! Ideal for advanced undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

YouTube’s Copyright System

Thursday, Nov. 7, 11 a.m.-Noon Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 19, Room 1920
Instructor: Laura Quilter

Do you use YouTube video platforms to share videos, or to teach with? What do you need to know about YouTube’s ContentID system? Come learn about responding to copyright claims, synch licensing for videos, and finding music for your videos. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

Intermediate Final Cut Pro

Thursday, Nov. 7, 6-7:30 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 3, Digital Media Lab
Instructor: Adam Quirós

Building on the Intro to Final Cut Pro workshop, attendees will learn more advanced techniques for video editing and processing. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and staff.

Web APIs: A (Nearly) Magical Way to Access Online Data

Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2-3 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 19, Room 1920
Instructor: Steve McGinty and Eric Bloomquist

If you’ve ever wished you could more-easily access large amounts of data from websites, the good news is that many government agencies, news outlets, and companies have set up public Web APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) to allow people to do exactly that. Web APIs essentially allow you to reach “behind” the organization’s website and access data much more directly. This workshop will be a basic introduction to Web APIs, including examples and pointers to additional resources. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and staff.

Fair Use and Copyright 101

Thursday, Nov. 14, 1-2 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 19, Room 1920
Instructor: Laura Quilter

If you take pictures with your phone, send emails, write papers, or doodle — congratulations, you’re a copyright owner! And, if you take pictures, forward emails, quote works, download music, or hum a song, guess what? You’re using a copyrighted work, relying on fair use or another copyright exception. What do you need to know to teach, create art, write papers, or simply live in a world in which practically everything we create and use is copyrighted? How do you avoid getting in trouble, or do you even have to worry? Come to a workshop with copyright attorney Laura Quilter to get the 101 on copyright and fair use. We promise not to turn you in to the copyright police. (And tell you if that’s even a thing.) Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

What's in a Map? A Crash-Course in GIS for the Social and Behavioral Sciences

Thursday, Nov. 14, 2-4 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Becky Seifried

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a catch-all term for the software that helps us create stellar maps and explore spatial patterns in our data. If you have ever used Google Maps to scope out your neighborhood or checked out interactive maps on the web, you already have experience using an Online GIS. But the software can be used for a lot more than just displaying information. Whether you are directly engaged in geographic-oriented research or just interested in delving into your quantitative or qualitative data in a new way, GIS is an essential tool for identifying spatial patterns over space and time. This two-hour workshop is meant for both students and faculty. It will give an overview of GIS and introduce its potential applications in fields across the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Ideal for SBS undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

Open Education: What's the Buzz?

Monday, Nov. 18, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 26, Faculty Commons
Instructor: Marilyn Billings

What is open education, what are open educational resources? Come find out and see how the use of these materials can be used to address student success, retention and affordability. Ideal for advanced undergraduates, graduates, and faculty.

Make Your First Virtual Reality (VR) in the Digital Media Lab

Tuesday, Nov. 19, 6-7:30 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 3, Digital Media Lab
Instructor: Yuntian Hu

Virtual reality allows users to preserve and animate 3D models and view them in a immersive virtual environment. They can build up a fantasy or historical place for their personal or academic needs. Attendees will learn how to work with the Unity platform and how to take advantage of more advanced services offered in the Digital Media Lab. Ideal for undergraduates.

Graphic Novels Petting Zoo: Let's Go Wild!

Thursday, Nov. 21, Noon-1:30 p.m.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lobby, East Side
Instructor: Jennifer Friedman

Need to relax? Love graphic novels? Join us to learn how to find graphic novels at UMass and the Five Colleges! BONUS: Find out how to get graphic novels from libraries all over the state of Massachusetts, even if you donâ€'t live here! BUT WAIT - there's more! We'll even show you where to get graphic novels online! Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, and staff.

What's in a Map? A Crash-Course in GIS for Librarians

Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2-3 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 19, Room 1920
Instructor: Becky Seifried

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a catch-all term for the software that helps researchers create stellar maps and explore spatial patterns in their data. If you have ever used Google Maps to scope out your neighborhood or checked out interactive maps on the web, you already have experience using an Online GIS. But the software can be used for a lot more than just displaying information. GIS is an essential tool for identifying spatial patterns over space and time and has wide-ranging applications in nearly every field – from analyzing crime stats to mapping archaeological artifacts, building effective architectural infrastructure, and tracking the spread of disease. This one-hour workshop is designed to give librarians an overview of GIS and provide a glimpse into its potential applications in a wide array of disciplines. Ideal for librarians.

Learning with the Labyrinth

Tuesday, Dec. 3, 4-6 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 26, Room 2601
Instructor: Madeleine Charney

Registration link forthcoming.

We'll kick off with a brief history of the labyrinth and how to use this ancient tool for concentration, creativity, decision making and personal growth. Followed by a free writing exercise, we will walk a fold out canvas labyrinth and share about our experiences. Finger labyrinths will also be available as an alternative to walking. Ideal for undergraduates and graduates.

Intro to Photoshop

Wednesday, Dec. 4, 10 a.m.-Noon Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Lower Level, Calipari Room
Instructor: Mike Foldy and Brian Shelburne

Have some personal photos you'd like doctored? Need to create a good clean image for a presentation? Want to revive old family images or perhaps delete your ex from the last family photos? Photoshop is a powerful image manipulation tool that can do these tasks and many others. This workshop is for those with no previous experience and would like to learn some basic image processing tasks in Photoshop. Attendees will learn some of the basic tasks such as image cropping, color correcting, and image cleaning. Ideal for undergraduates and graduates.

Japanese Bookbinding

Thursday, Dec. 5, 2-3:30 p.m. Register here.
W. E. B. Du Bois Library, Floor 16, Room 1638
Instructor: Sharon Domier

Details forthcoming. Ideal for undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and staff.